Movies

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Partition and growth of cinema(1947–1958)

Immediately following the partition, the newly founded Pakistan being a new state faced a shortage of funds . Shortage of filming equipment further paralysed the nation’s film industry.

With much hardships faced, the new film industry was able to produce its first feature film, Teri Yaad[3] on 7 August,[4] 1948,[5] premièring at the Parbhat Theatre in Lahore.[4] The following year, Evernew Studios established a studio in the country which would later become the largest film company of the time. Over the next few years, films that were released reached mediocre success until the release of Do Ansoo on 7 April 1950. Do Ansoo became the first film to attain a 25-week viewing making it the first film to reach silver jubilee status.

Recovery was evident with Noor Jehan‘s directorial debut Chanwey releasing on 29 April 1951. The film became the first film to be directed by a female director. Syed Faqir ahmad Shah produced his first production 1952 The “Jagga Daku” Saqlain Rizvi was the Director, the film could not get much appreciation due to violence shown in it. As cinema viewership increased, Sassi released on 3 June 1954 reached golden jubilee status staying on screens for 50-weeks. Legendary playback singer Ahmed Rushdi started his career in April 1955 after singing his first song in Pakistan “Bander Road Se Kemari”.Umar Marvi released on 12 March 1956 became the first ever Pakistani film made in the Sindhi language. To celebrate the success of these endeavours, film journalist Ilyas Rashidi launched an annual awarding event on July 17, 1958.[6] Named Nigar Awards, the event is since then considered Pakistan’s premier awarding event celebrating outstanding performance in various categories of filmmaking.[7]

Golden age under President Ayub Khan (1959–1969)

Further information: Syed KamalWaheed MuradSohail RanaAhmed Rushdi, and Nadeem

The ’60s decade is often cited as being the golden age of cinema in Pakistan. Many A-stars were introduced in this period in time and became legends on the silver screen. As black-and-white became obsolete, Pakistan saw the introduction of first colour films. Some that share the status of being firsts are Munshi Dil’s Azra in early 1960s, Zahir Raihan‘s Sangam (first full-length coloured film) released on 23 April 1964, and Mala (first coloured cinemascope film).

Although it seemed that the industry had stabilised to a certain extent, the relations between the two neighbouring countries were not. On 26 May 1961, Kay Productions released a film titled Bombay Wallah, which did not came under scrutiny from the censor board for having a name that represented a city in India in the wake of the growing tension between the region. Later, the censor board was blamed for irresponsibility.[8] It was the first time that a Pakistani film explored the realms of politics, but it would not be the last. In 1962, film Shaheed aka Martyr, pronounced the Palestine issue on the silver screen and became an instant hit. With the changing tide in the attitude of filmmakers, actress Mussarat Nazir who had reigned the industry for a while left for Canada and settled with her family. Her much anticipated film Bahadur was left unfinished and never released giving alternative films like Syed Kamal‘s debutant acting role in film Tauba to be admired and fill the void.

In September 1965, following an armed conflict between India and Pakistan, all Indian films were taken off the screen from cinemas in Pakistan and a complete ban was imposed on the Indian films. The ban existed since 1952 in West Pakistan and since 1962 in East Pakistan (now Bangladesh),[9] but was exercised rigorously after the conflict. Pakistani cinemas did not suffer much from the decision to remove the films and instead received better viewership for their films. Realising the potential, Waheed Murad stepped into the industry. His persona led people to call him the chocolate hero and in essence, he became the Marlon Brando and Elvis Presley of Pakistan.[10]

In 1966, film Armaan was released and became one of the most cherished accomplishments of the industry.[8] The film is said to have given birth to Pakistani pop music introducing playback singing legends – composer Sohail Rana and singer Ahmed Rushdi. The film became the first to complete 75-weeks screenings at cinema houses throughout the country attaining a platinum jubilee.[8] Another rising star Nazeer Beg with th stage-name Nadeem received instant success with his debut film Chakori in 1967. The same year, he would act in another film of a different genre altogether. Horror films were introduced with the release of Zinda Laash aka The Living Corpse making it the first film to display an R rating tag on its posters.[11]

Meanwhile Eastern Films Magazine, a tabloid edited by Said Haroon, became the most popular magazine for film buffs in Pakistan. The magazine had a questions and answers section titled “Yours Impishly” which the sub-editor Asif Noorani took inspiration for from I. S. Johar‘s page in India’s Filmfare magazine.[8] Tabloid like these got their first controversial covers with the release of Neela Parbat on 3 January 1969, which became Pakistan’s first feature-film with an adults-only tag.[10] The film ran for only three-to-four days at the box office.[12]

More controversial yet would be the offering of distribution rights in the Middle East to the Palestinian guerrilla organisation, Al Fatah by the writer, producer, and director Riaz Shahid for his film Zarqa released on 17 October 1969.[13] The film depicted the activities of the organisation.

Pakistan Film History

  • Pakistan Film Magazine proudly presents an unique website on Pakistani film history with comprehensive figures and facts since 1896.
  • In this segment, you will find details on all released films, music information’s and other milestones.
  • You can watch complete movies, movie scenes, songs and lot of other video entertainments as well.
  • Click on 60 years of Pakistani films and watch some complete movies, memorable scenes and evergreen songs from Pakistani films during last 60 decades…
  • The latest addition is The History of East Pakistani Movies with details on all Bangali and Urdu movies from Dhaka (Dacca, former East Pakistan).

The chronicle of Pakistani films 1948-2009
Here are some analysis on released films in nine different languages with some milestones in the red colors. You can click on any year in the first column of this table to access to your desired FilmHistory page. You can also click on any language title and read more on Pakistani languages on my other site Mazhar Iqbal’s Pakistan.
Remembering East Pakistan..!!!

Movies from Dacca, East Pakistan

 

Year’s Urdu Punjabi Bengali Sindhi Pashto Siraiki P/U*) Total Mile-
stones
Total
1.592
1.334
154
69
656
4
141
3.953
2009
8
7
0
0
9
0
1
24
3.953
2008
6
13
0
0
18
0
1
37
3.929
2007
11
15
0
0
15
0
1
41
3.892
2006
10
13
0
0
25
0
1
49
3.851
2005
13
8
0
0
26
0
3
50
3.802
2004
9
15
0
0
25
0
0
49
3.752
2003
17
13
0
0
17
0
0
47
3.703
2002
19
26
0
0
17
0
0
62
3.656
2001
27
19
0
0
12
0
0
58
3.594
2000
30
13
0
0
16
0
0
59
3.536
1999
29
6
0
0
15
0
0
50
3.477
1998
28
5
0
0
17
0
1
51
3.427
1997
35
9
0
1
21
0
0
66
3.376
1996
30
12
0
2
27
0
0
71
3.310
1995
14
18
0
0
23
0
9
64
3.239
1994
14
18
0
1
21
1
20
75
3.175
1993
11
16
0
2
23
0
35
87
3.100
1992
8
35
0
3
22
0
22
90
3.013
1991
6
27
0
1
29
0
32
95
2.923
1990
10
37
0
3
22
0
10
82
2.828
1989
16
40
0
8
29
0
6
99
2.746
1988
22
30
0
4
26
0
0
82
2.647
1987
28
30
0
1
17
0
0
76
2.565
1986
30
43
0
5
28
0
0
106
2.489
1985
22
38
0
4
22
0
0
86
2.383
1984
21
42
0
3
16
0
0
82
2.297
1983
17
36
0
1
26
0
0
80
2.215
1982
27
27
0
0
14
0
0
68
2.135
1981
26
44
0
1
14
0
0
85
2.067
1980
26
23
0
0
9
0
0
59
1.982
1979
41
44
0
3
8
0
0
96
1.923
1978
46
46
0
0
8
0
0
100
1.827
1977
42
33
0
1
5
0
0
81
1.727
1976
49
55
0
2
4
0
0
111
1.646
1975
48
50
0
5
7
1
0
111
1.535
1974
48
53
0
4
5
1
0
112
1.424
1973
38
43
0
4
6
1
0
92
1.312
1972
42
49
0
2
6
0
0
99
1.220
1971
33
38
4
2
5
0
0
83
1.121
1970
42
44
38
1
1
0
0
127
1.038
1969
51
39
26
1
0
0
0
117
911
1968
64
35
27
1
0
0
0
127
794
1967
48
18
15
0
0
0
0
81
667
1966
52
20
19
0
0
0
0
91
586
1965
41
13
4
0
0
0
0
58
495
1964
52
14
8
0
0
0
0
74
437
1963
40
6
2
0
0
0
0
48
363
1962
30
4
1
0
0
0
0
35
315
1961
30
4
4
0
0
0
0
38
280
1960
34
4
1
0
0
0
0
39
242
1959
25
10
3
0
0
0
0
38
203
1958
23
7
0
3
0
0
0
33
165
1957
21
6
1
0
0
0
0
28
132
1956
23
7
1
0
0
0
0
31
104
1955
15
4
0
0
0
0
0
19
73
1954
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
54
1953
9
1
0
0
0
0
0
10
47
1952
6
1
0
0
0
0
0
7
37
1951
7
3
0
0
0
0
0
10
30
1950
10
3
0
0
0
0
0
13
20
1949
4
2
0
0
0
0
0
6
7
1948
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1947
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

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